5 Characteristics of Great Court Reporters

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5 Characteristics of Great Court Reporters

women typing on a computer with a drink beside her

The median court reporter salary was $60,130 last year. If you’re wondering how to become a court reporter or you’re looking into court reporter school, does that figure motivate you to get more serious about pursuing court reporter jobs? 

What is a court reporter anyway? Court reporters sit in at trials, depositions, and other legal proceedings to transcribe word-for-word what is said. Many states require licensing or certification for this important job. 

What does it take to be a great court reporter? Keep reading to learn these 5 crucial characteristics every court report should possess.

Punctuality 

It is imperative that a court reporter shows up on time to court, depositions, and every legal proceeding. It is not acceptable to have attorneys, witnesses, and judges left waiting for you to appear to start your very important job. 

It’s not fair to waste someone’s time and it is very unprofessional. If being punctual is not in your DNA, this isn’t the job for you. 

Possess Excellent Grammar and Spelling Skills 

Do you know how to use your and you’re correctly? How about their, there, and they’re? Excellent grammar and spelling skills are a must for a court reporter. 

There are editing and proofreading involved in reviewing the court transcripts to prepare them for clients and the court. The transcripts should be free of spelling, punctuation, and grammar errors. 

Strong Time Management Skills 

Once the deposition or court proceeding has concluded, a court reporter works independently to prepare the transcript. Being able to effectively manage time is important. There are deadlines to meet. You need to be able to balance your appointments with the follow-up work of editing and proofreading that is also part of the job. 

Accurate and Speedy 

You have no control over how fast people are speaking in a trial or deposition. You have to record exactly what they say, so it’s important to be extremely accurate. This requires focus and speedy typing skills.

When training for the job, you are required to pass a speed test so this skill is vitally important. 

Respects Confidentiality

If you love to gossip, you have to push that trait aside when you’re working as a court reporter. You’ll learn things in court about people that is not public information. It’s up to you to act as a professional and keep the details of any court proceeding to yourself and the transcript you’re preparing. 

A Team of Great Court Reporters 

Do you know who can help you with your court reporting needs? We at Depo International are the “Trial Lawyer’s Choice” for comprehensive court reporting, legal support and legal videography services with over 40 year’s experience in the business. 

Contact us today and learn more about our comprehensive services. 

What’s Next?

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Now That You've Finished Your Depositions, What's Next?

See Below how Depo International can give your trial team the Winning Edge, whether your trial will be held via Zoom or in person!

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presentation creation
video depositions
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Court/War Room
Trial, Arbitration and Hearing
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We've Got You!

When we say “We’ve Got You” we mean it. We’ve got you covered before trial with our professional court reporters and CLVS videographers, and we’ve got you covered at the trial with our certified trial team.

Our 5-star team is always here for you!

Remember:  We are your one-stop shop: reporting, videography, deposition management, and courtroom presentation. 

Call us today to host your case and all of the depositions and exhibits – we have your back! 

Want to Learn More About DepoRemote & Depo  International?
Call Us: (800-591-9722) or Visit Our Website »

3 Ultra-Useful Tips for Scheduling a Remote Deposition

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3 Ultra-Useful Tips for Scheduling a Remote Deposition

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The legal process is changing. Since 2020, almost every state has passed rulings allowing for the remote collection of witness testimony. 

When your trial can cost thousands of dollars in legal fees, you want to make sure you have the best means of collecting your evidence. But if you aren’t used to remote depositions, you could be making a lot of mistakes. Here are some simple and easy tips for scheduling your remote deposition.

What Is a Deposition Hearing?

At the very most basic, a deposition hearing is a sworn, out-of-court testimony given by a witness in a civil lawsuit. Functionally, it is a question and answer session between lawyer and witness, and serves to both gain information, as well as create an accountable legal record of witness testimony.

Why Remote?

The pandemic has changed a lot of how interactions between people occur. As we transition globally into more and more remote use services, we see shifts in procedure within all sorts of fields, including the legal system.
Remote depositions are one of those shifts. But these forms of interview present unique challenges for the legal teams involved in the process. 

Check the Technology

Technical issues are a pain in the butt. Nothing can flatline your Deposition hearing like a bad signal, or a lack of necessary equipment. 

There’s a couple of important things to check for in that regard. Firstly, are you all going to be in a Zoom call, or are some of you going to be socially distanced in a single location? Does the Deponent have access to a functioning computer or tablet with which they can connect to your call or video chat?

Another technological concern of remote deposition is transcription. You’ll want to inform the court reporter and their team ahead of time to ensure that you have your transcript in as short a time as possible. You should also talk to them about whether or not you will require a real-time feed ahead of time.

You can also hire a remote deposition service to help you handle these concerns and more.

Request Your Documents

Documentation is an important part of the legal process. In the face of the current climate, getting ahold of those documents can often take more time than you might expect.

Make sure to request any documentation you require well ahead of time.  Remember that even digital copy can often be a little delayed to safety procedures in the current climate.

This also applies to exhibits! Keep a tech support agent on hand, and coordinate with them ahead of time to ensure a timely and proper display of exhibits at request.

Prepare Yourself for Your Remote Deposition

You are the greatest and most important tool in your arsenal. There’s a number of ways you can prepare yourself ahead of time for your remote deposition to get the edge on your opposition.

You know what happens at a deposition hearing normally, but how does a remote deposition differ? Check the local and state laws well ahead of time to ensure you know what changes you may need to make to your setup.

Familiarize yourself with your platform – how is it used, what can it do, what are its limitations? You can also try performing a mock deposition through the platform with a colleague. Remember to adjust your questions and communications styles for a virtual environment!

All Your Remote Needs in One Place

If you want to make preparing for your remote deposition a breeze, contact our team of trained professionals. Depo International is a service built for litigation and provides comprehensive services for your legal needs. 

Check out our blog for more helpful tips!